Hi my name is Sarah, i'm 18 and love ocelots more than you. & and I have


Paper Nautilus
Photograph by Robert Sisson, National Geographic
Females of this unusual octopus species sequester themselves in thin, translucent shells with which they drift across the open seas. Paper nautiluses, also called argonauts, secrete the shells to serve as cases for their eggs—but it has recently been discovered that they also function as air-trapping ballast tanks, which allow the cephalopods to hang effortlessly in the water column without sinking. This is the only species known to use surface air bubbles to effectively control the animals’ buoyancy.

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